ISSN 2734-245X
 

Case Report

Online Publishing Date:
12 / 02 / 2023

 


Genital ulcer disease in a four-year-old child: Diagnostic challenges in a resource-limited setting

Eshan B. Henshaw, Olayinka A. Olasode, Imaobong S. Etuk.


Abstract
Background/Objective: Genital Ulcer diseases (GUD) are ulcerative lesions around the genitals, with or without regional lymph node enlargement, and which may or may not be sexually transmitted. The presence of inguinal/femoral lymphadenopathy (buboes) increases the likelihood of a sexually transmitted infection, presumably Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) or Chancroid. These conditions are rare in nonsexually active persons, such as children.
The Case: We report a rare case of GUD with inguinal and femoral lymphadenopathy in a 4 year old girl, who was often left in the care of an adolescent
male relative. There was no disclosure of sexual abuse, however, physical findings revealed suppurative buboes, suggestive of a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Objective evidence of sexual penetration was absent, as physical examination revealed an intact hymen. Lack of trained manpower, and diagnostic tools are some of the limitations to confirmation of the aetiology of GUD in resource limited settings.
Conclusion: This report is important on several fronts - it raises the possibility of childhood STI, but reveals the difficulty in confirming such a diagnosis in a resource deficient setting; it also brings into focus the probability of child sexual abuse (CSA) which is becoming more prevalent worldwide

Key words: Sexually transmitted infections, Lymphogranuloma venerum, Sexual abuse


 
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How to Cite this Article
Pubmed Style

Henshaw EB, Olasode OA, Etuk IS. Genital ulcer disease in a four-year-old child: Diagnostic challenges in a resource-limited setting. crjmed. 2017; 1(2): 11-13. doi:10.5455/CRJMED.143537


Web Style

Henshaw EB, Olasode OA, Etuk IS. Genital ulcer disease in a four-year-old child: Diagnostic challenges in a resource-limited setting. https://www.crjmed.com/?mno=143537 [Access: May 12, 2024]. doi:10.5455/CRJMED.143537


AMA (American Medical Association) Style

Henshaw EB, Olasode OA, Etuk IS. Genital ulcer disease in a four-year-old child: Diagnostic challenges in a resource-limited setting. crjmed. 2017; 1(2): 11-13. doi:10.5455/CRJMED.143537



Vancouver/ICMJE Style

Henshaw EB, Olasode OA, Etuk IS. Genital ulcer disease in a four-year-old child: Diagnostic challenges in a resource-limited setting. crjmed. (2017), [cited May 12, 2024]; 1(2): 11-13. doi:10.5455/CRJMED.143537



Harvard Style

Henshaw, E. B., Olasode, . O. A. & Etuk, . I. S. (2017) Genital ulcer disease in a four-year-old child: Diagnostic challenges in a resource-limited setting. crjmed, 1 (2), 11-13. doi:10.5455/CRJMED.143537



Turabian Style

Henshaw, Eshan B., Olayinka A. Olasode, and Imaobong S. Etuk. 2017. Genital ulcer disease in a four-year-old child: Diagnostic challenges in a resource-limited setting. Cross River Journal of Medicine, 1 (2), 11-13. doi:10.5455/CRJMED.143537



Chicago Style

Henshaw, Eshan B., Olayinka A. Olasode, and Imaobong S. Etuk. "Genital ulcer disease in a four-year-old child: Diagnostic challenges in a resource-limited setting." Cross River Journal of Medicine 1 (2017), 11-13. doi:10.5455/CRJMED.143537



MLA (The Modern Language Association) Style

Henshaw, Eshan B., Olayinka A. Olasode, and Imaobong S. Etuk. "Genital ulcer disease in a four-year-old child: Diagnostic challenges in a resource-limited setting." Cross River Journal of Medicine 1.2 (2017), 11-13. Print. doi:10.5455/CRJMED.143537



APA (American Psychological Association) Style

Henshaw, E. B., Olasode, . O. A. & Etuk, . I. S. (2017) Genital ulcer disease in a four-year-old child: Diagnostic challenges in a resource-limited setting. Cross River Journal of Medicine, 1 (2), 11-13. doi:10.5455/CRJMED.143537